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It’s my padlet and I’ll glee if I want to.

 

 

Laura's Padlet

 

Do you see that teeny tiny picture above this text? Of course you do (Or I really hope you do, or I’ve done something wrong)! Do me a favour and give that teeny tiny picture a click to take you to the full-size, real-deal posting of my padlet wall that I’ve created all about myself.

Now that you’re there, I’m sure some of you might be thinking, “Wow, Laura. Does Glee really deserve half the space in a pictorial description of your entire life?”. Well, my response for you is yes. Yes it does. That weekend ruled and I’m still not over it. This is my padlet and I’ll glee  if I want to

That’s kind of the beauty of this program. You can use it for nearly any content, and it’s still going to look great and get your point across to your viewer. Students could make a padlet for any subject and customize it to suit their needs. To me it’s like “Posterboard 2.0”. You still get the great representation of ideas like a posterboard has, but it has more options for media (like videos!), less waste of materials (think of all the savings on printer paper and ink!), it’s much easier to take home and mark, and it will be around forever (rather than getting tossed into the dumpster as soon as it’s been returned).

It also makes you condense your ideas, as it’s obvious that the text is meant to be used more as a caption than a long story space. It think this is such an important skill for kids to learn, especially in our age of technology where a tweet can be more powerful than a 10 page essay.

I think I will begin using padlet in my classrooms in the future much in the same way I demonstrated it here. It’s a great way to get to know someone quickly, and can even be referred back to as the teacher learns their student’s names and preferences. This would be a great low stress introduction to the program, which would make using it for projects in the future an easy transition.

Or, you know, maybe I’ll just keep using it to display my love for glee. 😉

 

All the best,

Laura

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I was a coder and I didn’t even know’d-er?

This week I tried my hand at coding and was surprised at how familiar the process was!

To be honest, when I heard that we were coding this week I assumed that we would be coding websites using html or something similar. Once I realized that this was not the case, it was a pleasant surprise to discover that this other type of coding is something that I actually had experience with!

After trying out a few rounds of EspressoCoding I was reminded of one of my favourite Nintendo DS games, WarioWare DIY. This is a game where you essentially design your own simple mini games, then upload your game for others to play, as well as download other player’s games. It had you draw the backgrounds and moveable pieces, and then code those things to create an objective for your game as well as a way to win your mini game. This game had me coding video games without me even realizing it! Nintendo DS games are still compatible with newer DS systems, so this would be a great recommendation for students who are interested in coding or creating video games.

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Anyway, after realizing that I definitely had a lot of fun playing around on EspressoCoding’s website! Though some of the tasks were a little simplistic (as they should be considering they’re aimed at people younger than me) there was still lots of cool things you could play around with to make it your own. I had particular fun making it so that clicking one object would make another move, as well as pretending my cranes were crashing into each other.

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Yikes, don’t tell the foreman that I was playing chicken with his valuable equipment!

I loved the easiness with which this website explained coding, as well as the opportunity for students to play around with the software to see what they can do. I would love to bring coding into my classroom in the future, and maybe evolve it to hands on projects as well. I did a lot of workshops with Lego Mindstorm kits when I worked at the Science Centre last summer and would absolutely love to be able to build something like that with my students in the future!

Expecto Paw-tronum!

As soon as I saw this assignment on ds106 I knew I had to do it! I love nothing better than puns, and putting together animal and human is just asking for some sweet, sweet puns to be made.

And so I give you…. Ron Weasel-y!

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My love for Harry Potter is one that has lasted for many years, and I feel as though this pun has just been waiting to be made that entire time. From the red fur to match the classic Weasley red hair, to that smirk on Ron’s face that says “I’m a weasel and I’m proud!”, I think this image may just be my favourite thing I’ve created this semester.

With basic knowledge of Photoshop (or a similar program such as gimp) this photo manipulation is easy enough to create. I just used the polygonal lasso tool to cut Ron’s face out, then copied and pasted it into the image of the weasel. After that, a little bit of touch up with the eraser tool and using the clone tool to get rid of some out of place whiskers resulted in this finished product!

Photo manipulation is something that I have tried in the classroom before, and has both gone really well and crashed and burned. For a classroom that’s very comfortable with computers, building skills in Photoshop and becoming comfortable with the various tools can be a great way to engage kids in graphic arts. I’ve had students excel in creating photo manipulations and be extremely proud of the work they’ve done. Other classes, however, may become frustrated with the finickiness of the lasso tool in particular and see photo manipulation as a waste of time.

With that being said I think it’s a really useful (and fun!) skill to learn in our technological world as many students may be interested in the growing field of graphic design. I will definitely continue to try and teach graphic design to students in the future, and hopefully photo manipulation finds a place in that.